Monday, 1 January 2018

"Militia" by Michael Hill

Another win from the marvellous Goodreads site. The review below is taken from my Goodreads page.

MilitiaMilitia by Michael Hill
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

William Mitchell is an apple farmer in rural Massachusetts when tensions rise between the local Patriots and the British-supporting Tories. Joining his local militia William finds himself going into battle against the well trained British and struggling with balancing his ordinary home life with life as s soldier, trying to protect that very life. His time in service sees him take part in several battles of the Revolutionary War before becoming a representative of his community and being a part of the development of the US Constitution.

Whilst William is a fictional character the novel is based on actual events and features some real names - several of whom are the ancestors of author Michael Hill.

The novel is short at under 200 pages and doesn't delve into the depths of the War of Independence, the catalysts and aims of the Revolution. It does, however, give a neat overview of the period through the eyes of one ordinary man. Many brave men (and women, as the book acknowledges) did take up arms to protect their communities and their fears and trials are recognised in William's experiences.

The brevity of the story means that things are explained quickly. There is little time for background descriptions of William's home or time to develop the personalities and characters of him and his wife, Doll. Conversations and speech is unnatural and somewhat wooden and I admit that the first chapter didn't excite me into looking forward to the rest of the book. That soon changed as the conflict started and I did start to get right into William's motives and fears. Here is a quite real hero - an ordinary man thrown into something that he doesn't really want to be part of. His experiences in battle are as confused as battle itself is (I imagine) and his post-traumatic stresses are genuinely moving. The human condition is skillfully understood even if the overall depiction lacks a true novelist's touch.

Criticising the quality of writing isn't the point here. Michael Hill is rightly proud of his ancestry and their achievements and getting their story into a wider audience is the point. Hill has done that and the story is entertaining and educational.

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