Saturday, 22 July 2017

The Ship Trilogy by D Krauss - an epic journey that deserves wider audience

What did I get? The Ship Trilogy by D Krauss, comprising "The Ship to look for God", "The Ship Looking for God" and "The Ship Finding God".

How did I get them? The first was from a giveaway at, you've guessed it, Goodreads. The second and third were sent by the author after I posted a review at Goodreads. See? It pays off to post!


My review of The Ship to Look for God and The Ship Looking for God  are worth reading to see how my reviews progress with this strange series - the final review from Goodreads is below. They aren't good reviews, I'll admit that, as the trilogy is hard to talk about without giving too much away. They do deserve a wider audience though.


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The Ship Finding GodThe Ship Finding God by D. Krauss
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Thanks to the author for sending this book after I reviewed the first 2 books in the series.

This book concludes the trilogy after "The Ship To Look For God" and "The Ship Looking For God". The trilogy is an odyssey in which our hero, Otto Boteman, dies and embarks upon a journey through times, spaces, dimensions and mind boggling circumstances in search of an answer.

This volume moves Otto on to his goal and there are far fewer new faces in this book. The tone is different as the answer nears and the steady introduction of famous names from history makes way for angels and other beings. It's difficult to talk more openly for fear of spoiling the plot and the answer to the supreme question and I'm going to hope that this ambiguity encourages readers to read my reviews of the first 2 books and seek them out for themselves. This trilogy is not published by a major name, in fact it seems to have been self-published. In my view, Otto's journey deserves wider attention. Goodreads is full of testifying memoirs and books in praise of God, Christ and other deities. These books are different - they ask questions. Of course it leads to a spiritual conclusion and yes, JC has a cameo. But it also has an open ending that makes one think and leaves space for you to find your own interpretation. It's a positive message, I concluded, that steers away from hate and damnation and points towards being good.

I have typed this review some time after reading the book. I wasn't as pleased with the ending as I wanted to be as I, like most readers, expect and prefer a distinct conclusion. Maybe that's unfair with a subject matter like this and having re-read main parts again there are different interpretations that can be made by different readers. I'm not a very religious person but do appreciate spirituality and the loving parts of faith.

And after everything Otto has been through, he still seems oddly surprised at each new acquaintance!


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Saturday, 8 July 2017

The Index of Dreams by Vicky Matthews - a macabre tale of obession

Today's freebie - The Index of Dreams (paperback) by Vicky Matthews

Thanks to? Goodreads, as usual.


Yet another giveaway from Goodreads and another fine debut novel. My quick review below is taken from the Goodreads site.


The Index of DreamsThe Index of Dreams by Vicky Matthews
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I won this through Goodreads.

A fine debut novel that deserves a wider audience. Sabina (Beanie) is one of life's drifters - temping job after temping job with no plan and not much promise for the future. Her only meaning in life is an obsession with a film she hasn't seen (it's banned)- The Index of Dreams - and it's creator Ossian Brohmer. A chance encounter brings Beanie and the film closer together and Life takes on meaning and excitement. Beanie moves to the seaside and becomes acquainted with Brohmer as the story takes on deeper themes of control and obsession.
Everyone seeks some meaning in life and some people don't find that in day to day things that surround them - they reach for art or celebrity, anything that can hold focus. This is Beanie and the story of her search for meaning and whether she has the strength to control or be controlled.

Thoroughly recommended.


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Saturday, 1 July 2017

Carrying Albert home by Homer Hickam. Wonderfully bizarre.

Today's reviewed freebie? "Carrying Albert home : the Somewhat True Story of a Man, his Wife and her Alligator" by Homer Hickam

Where from? Another one from Goodreads



Carrying Albert Home: The Somewhat True Story of A Man, His Wife, and Her AlligatorCarrying Albert Home: The Somewhat True Story of A Man, His Wife, and Her Alligator by Homer Hickam
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Thanks to Goodreads for this giveaway.

Sometimes a couple's love isn't based wholly on love as we think of it. It's sometimes based on respect, a deep feeling that doesn't always manifest itself but is there nonetheless. This book is of such a couple - a hidden love.

This dreamy novel is based on stories told by the author's mother that are somewhat embellished by the author. Albert is the alligator, a gift to Elsie from a former lover and a reminder of her days in Florida when life stretched before her. That life was meant to be with Buddy Epsen (the real person - Google him) but when Buddy moved to New York Elsie found herself back in West Virginia and married to her high school sweetheart, the miner Homer Hickam. Albert was Buddy's gift, a memento of Florida.

Elsie remains unfulfilled with life in West Virginia, raising an alligator in a bath. When Homer tires of his housemate he gives Elsie an ultimatum - Albert or him. Elsie considers in some depth, and decides to take Albert back home to his native home of Florida. Homer gets a sabbatical period from his employer and accompanies them both on a bizarre road trip across America during the Depression era.

On route the trio meet other real characters such as John Steinbeck and Ernest Hemingway and even appear in a Tarzan film.

Akin the "100 year old man who climbed out the window and disappeared" by Jonas Jonasson, this is a hazy novel with some real dream sequences. It's a warm, funny, uplifting book that is a love story without romance. Quite bizarre, in fact utterly mad at times, it's a wonderful summer read.

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